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"A really good practitioner never stops learning and is never qualified as there is always something more to learn."

Diana Mossop

About The Human Tongue

Anchored to the floor of the mouth and slung at the rear from muscles attached to a spiky outgrowth at the base of the skull, the tongue is a strong muscle that is covered by the lingual membrane, which has special areas which detect the flavor of food. The tongue is made up of muscles covered by mucous membranes. These muscles are attached to the lower jaw and to the hyoid bone a small, U-shaped bone, which lies deep in the muscles at the back of the tongue above the larynx. There are very small nodules, called papillae, from the top surface of the tongue, which give it its rough texture. Between the papillae at the sides and base of the tongue are small, bulblike structures that are sensory organs, called "taste buds," which enable us to enjoy the sensations of flavor and warn us when food is unfit to eat. The muscle fibers are heavily supplied with nerves, so it can manipulate food in the mouth and place it between the teeth for chewing - without being bitten in the process. Babies have many more taste buds than an adult, and they have these almost everywhere in the mouth, including the cheeks. Nevertheless, adults enjoy more flavors than babies, who dislike bitter tastes and prefer bland food. The tongue also aids in the formation of sounds of speech and coordinates its movements to aid in swallowing. It is especially helpful when we are forced to "eat our words." Enjoy!


Tongue

Anchored to the floor of the mouth and slung at the rear from muscles attached to a spiky outgrowth at the base of the skull, the tongue is a strong muscle that is covered by the lingual membrane, which has special areas which detect the flavor of food. The tongue is made up of muscles covered by mucous membranes. These muscles are attached to the lower jaw and to the hyoid bone (a small, U-shaped bone, which lies deep in the muscles at the back of the tongue) above the larynx. There are very small nodules, called papillae, from the top surface of the tongue, which give it its rough texture. Between the papillae at the sides and base of the tongue are small, bulblike structures that are sensory organs, called "taste buds," which enable us to enjoy the sensations of flavor and warn us when food is unfit to eat. The muscle fibers are heavily supplied with nerves, so it can manipulate food in the mouth and place it between the teeth for chewing - without being bitten in the process. Babies have many more taste buds than an adult, and they have these almost everywhere in the mouth, including the cheeks. Nevertheless, adults enjoy more flavors than babies, who dislike bitter tastes and prefer bland food. The tongue also aids in the formation of sounds of speech and coordinates its movements to aid in swallowing. It is especially helpful when we are forced to "eat our words." Enjoy!

The information on this website is provided for information purposes only and is not intended or recommended as a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor/physician or other qualified health care provider regarding any medical condition or treatment. Some or all of the information on this page may be supplied by a third-party and not controlled by the DianaMossop.com website or authors and is therefore is not the responsibility of the DianaMossop.com website or its authors.

Testimonials

I went to see my GP in February 1998 after experiencing pins and needles in my left arm and fingers. At first I thought it may have been just a trapped nerve but after it continued for a week and I began to feel worse in myself no…

Dearest Diana - thought I'd write you a letter, To just let you know that I'm feeling much better, I came to your clinic in a state of despair, And left feeling " New ", like a breath of fresh air. I’d tried all the doctors, di…