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"Natural medicine is really all about common sense."

Diana Mossop

About The Human Skin

Skin is the outside covering of body tissue, which protects inner cells and organs from the outside environment. The skin is the largest organ of the body, and its cells are continuously replaced as they are lost to normal wear and tear. The skin totals between twelve and twenty square feet in area and accounts for 12%% of body weight. It is composed of three integrated layers: the epidermis, the dermis and the subcutis. The thickness of the epidermis and the dermis varies over different parts of the body. It is thickest on the palms of the hands and feet, where friction is needed for gripping, and it is thinnest on the eyelids, which must be light and flexible. The epidermis also grows into fingernails, toenails and hair. The dermis, or true skin, is thick, sturdy, rich in nerves and blood vessels and in sweat glands. It shields and repairs injured tissue. This layer consists mostly of collagen, which originates from cells called fibroblasts and is one of the strongest proteins found in nature. It gives skin durability and resilence. The subcutis, joined to the bottom of the dermis, is the deepest layer of the skin. It contains "lipocytes," which produce lipids for the subcutaneous tissue to make a fatty layer which cushions muscles, bones and inner organs against shocks, and acts as an insulator and source of energy during lean times. The skin registers sensation constantly and supports a teeming, unseen population of tiny organisms. Not only does the skin harden from use, but it molds into varied shapes, and it responds to the most delicate touch, becoming an organ of communication - sometimes more eloquent than words. So tough and durable is the skin that when a 2,000-year-old Egyptian mummy was fingerprinted, the ridges were perfectly preserved.


Skin

Skin is the outside covering of body tissue, which protects inner cells and organs from the outside environment. The Skin is the largest organ of the body, and its cells are continuously replaced as they are lost to normal wear and tear. The skin totals between twelve and twenty square feet in area and accounts for 12%% of body weight. It is composed of three integrated layers: the epidermis, the dermis and the subcutis. The thickness of the epidermis and the dermis varies over different parts of the body. It is thickest on the palms of the hands and feet, where friction is needed for gripping, and it is thinnest on the eyelids, which must be light and flexible. The epidermis also grows into fingernails, toenails and hair. The dermis, or true skin, is thick, sturdy, rich in nerves and blood vessels and in sweat glands. It shields and repairs injured tissue. This layer consists mostly of collagen, which originates from cells called fibroblasts and is one of the strongest proteins found in nature. It gives skin durability and resilence. The subcutis, joined to the bottom of the dermis, is the deepest layer of the skin. It contains "lipocytes," which produce lipids for the subcutaneous tissue to make a fatty layer which cushions muscles, bones and inner organs against shocks, and acts as an insulator and source of energy during lean times. The skin registers sensation constantly and supports a teeming, unseen population of tiny organisms. Not only does the skin harden from use, but it molds into varied shapes, and it responds to the most delicate touch, becoming an organ of communication - sometimes more eloquent than words. So tough and durable is the skin that when a 2,000-year-old Egyptian mummy was fingerprinted, the ridges were perfectly preserved.

The information on this website is provided for information purposes only and is not intended or recommended as a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor/physician or other qualified health care provider regarding any medical condition or treatment. Some or all of the information on this page may be supplied by a third-party and not controlled by the DianaMossop.com website or authors and is therefore is not the responsibility of the DianaMossop.com website or its authors.

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