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"Flower and Tree formulas like Acupuncture without needles!"

Diana Mossop

About The Human Blood

Blood is a combination of plasma watery liquid and cells that float in it. It is a specialized bodily fluid that supplies essentials substances and nutrients, such as sugar, oxygen, and hormones to our cells, and carries waste away from those cells, this waste is eventually flushed out of the body in urine, feces, sweat, and lungs carbon dioxide. Blood also contains clotting agents.


Physical Situations Related To The Human Blood

When blood is not supplied to cell systems, the cells die very quickly

Arteries

Internally, the heart is divided into four hollow chambers, two on the left and two on the right. The upper chambers, called "atria," have relatively thin walls and receive blood returning through the veins. The lower chambers, the "ventricles," force blood out of the heart into the arteries to be carried back to the various sites throughout the body. Arteries are strong, elastic vessels that are adapted for carrying blood away from the heart under relatively high pressure. Arteries divide into progressively thinner and thinner tubes and eventually become fine branches called "arterioles" and "capillaries." Arteries parallel the courses taken by veins, which carry the blood back to the heart, and usually have the same names as their companion veins. For example, the renal artery parallels the renal vein, the common iliac artery parallels the common iliac vein, and so forth.

Artery/Vein Tissues

Arteries and veins have the same layers of tissues in their walls, but the proportions of these layers differ. Lining the core of each is a thin layer of endothelium, and covering each is a sheath of connective tissue, but an artery has thick intermediate layers of elastic and muscular fiber, while in the vein, these are less developed. The arterial wall helps to withstand and absorb the pressure waves which begin in the heart and are transmitted by the blood. The wall expands with the force of a swell, then snaps back to push the blood forward as the heart rests. Valves in the arteries prevent the blood from flowing backwards at this time, so pressure peaks are slowly flattened out as the fluid proceeds through the arterial vessels. As blood enters the capillary network (the smallest vessels in the body), the pressure falls off. When the capillaries meet and form the veins, the blood is oozing rather than surging. There is no need now for the strength and elasticity of the arteries, so the walls of the veins are thin and almost floppy. To make up for this, many veins are located in the skeletal muscles, and the least movement of a limb squeezes the vein and drives the blood toward the heart. Valves are again used to ensure flow in the right direction.

Blood Vessels/Nerves in The Dermis

Blood vessels in the dermis supply nutrients to the deep living layers of the epidermis, as well as to dermis cells. These vessels also play an important role in the regulation of body temperature. There are numerous nerve fibers scattered throughout the dermis. Some of them (motor fibers) carry impulses to dermal muscles and glands, causing these structures to react. Others (sensory fibers) carry impulses away from specialized sensory receptors located within the dermis. One set of dermal receptors (Pacinian corpuscles) is stimulated by heavy pressure, while another set (Meissner's corpuscles) is sensitive to light touch. Still other receptors are stimulated by temperature changes or by factors that can damage tissues.

Valves in Arteries/Veins

While arteries utilize vessel size to move blood by pressure, veins use one-way valves controlled by muscle contractions.

Veins

Internally, the heart is divided into four hollow chambers, two on the left and two on the right. The upper chambers, called "atria," have relatively thin walls and receive blood returning through the veins. The lower chamber, the "ventricles," force blood out of the heart into the arteries to be carried back to the various sites throughout the body. Veins are responsible for returning blood to the heart after exchanges of gases, nutrients, and wastes have been made between the blood and the body cells. Veins begin when capillaries merge into venules, the venules into small veins, and the small veins merge into larger ones. They are harder to follow than the arteries, because these vessels are interconnected with irregular networks, so that many small unnamed venules may join to form a larger vein. On the other hand, larger veins typically parallel the courses taken by named arteries, and the veins are often given the same name as the companion arteries. The veins from all parts of the body (except from the lungs back to the heart) converge into two major paths that lead to the right atrium of the heart. These veins are the "superior vena cava" and the "inferior vena cava."

The information on this website is provided for information purposes only and is not intended or recommended as a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor/physician or other qualified health care provider regarding any medical condition or treatment. Some or all of the information on this page may be supplied by a third-party and not controlled by the DianaMossop.com website or authors and is therefore is not the responsibility of the DianaMossop.com website or its authors.

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