DNNMasters SEO URL Provider is running in evaluation mode. Please purchase license on www.dnnmasters.com

 

"Phytobiophysics Flower Formulas stabilise emotions and create harmony. They encourage the body’s own innate ability to heal on a very profound level."

Diana Mossop

About The Human Uterus

The uterus or "womb" is a hollow, muscular organ in which a fertilized egg, called the "zygote," becomes embedded and in which the egg is nourished and allowed to develop until birth. It lies in the pelvic cavity behind the bladder and in front of the bowel. The uterus usually tilts forward at a ninety degree angle to the vagina, although in about 20%% of women, it tilts backwards. The uterus is lined with tissues which change during the menstrual cycle. These tissues build under the influence of hormones from the ovary. When the hormones withdraw after the menstrual cycle, the blood supply is cut off and the tissues and unfertilized egg are shed as waste. During pregnancy, the uterus stretches from three to four inches in length to a size which will accommodate a growing baby. During this time, muscular walls increase from two to three ounces to about two pounds and these powerful muscles release the baby through the birth canal with great force. The womb shrinks back to half its pregnant weight before a baby is a week old. By the time the baby is a month old, the uterus may be as small as when the egg first entered. Superstition, myth or ignorance have surrounded the menstrual period since the beginning of time. This is largely due to a primitive fear of blood. The word, "taboo," may stem from the Polynesian word for menstruation, but not all legends are negative a girl's first menses is celebrated in some societies, because it is a sign that she can bear children.


Uterus

The uterus or "womb" is a hollow, muscular organ in which a fertilized egg, called the "zygote," becomes embedded and in which the egg is nourished and allowed to develop until birth. It lies in the pelvic cavity behind the bladder and in front of the bowel. The uterus usually tilts forward at a ninety degree angle to the vagina, although in about 20%% of women, it tilts backwards. The uterus is lined with tissues which change during the menstrual cycle. These tissues build under the influence of hormones from the ovary. When the hormones withdraw after the menstrual cycle, the blood supply is cut off and the tissues and unfertilized egg are shed as waste. During pregnancy, the uterus stretches from three to four inches in length to a size which will accommodate a growing baby. During this time, muscular walls increase from two to three ounces to about two pounds and these powerful muscles release the baby through the birth canal with great force. The womb shrinks back to half its pregnant weight before a baby is a week old. By the time the baby is a month old, the uterus may be as small as when the egg first entered. Superstition, myth or ignorance have surrounded the menstrual period since the beginning of time. This is largely due to a primitive fear of blood. The word, "taboo," may stem from the Polynesian word for menstruation, but not all legends are negative; a girl's first menses is celebrated in some societies, because it is a sign that she can bear children.

Wall of the Uterus

The wall of the uterus is relatively thick and is composed of three layers: endometrium, myometrium, and perimetrium. The "endometrium" is the inner mucosal layer lining and is covered with columnar epithelium (tissue that covers all free body surfaces) and tubular glands. The "myometrium" is a very thick, muscular layer, consisting largely of bundles of smooth muscle fibers arranged in longitudinal, circular, and spiral patterns, and interlaced with connective tissue. The "perimetrium" is the outer layer. It is composed of the peritoneal layer of the broad ligament (proper ovarian ligament) that covers the body of the uterus and part of the cervix.

Articles / Blogs / News Related To The Human Uterus


The information on this website is provided for information purposes only and is not intended or recommended as a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor/physician or other qualified health care provider regarding any medical condition or treatment. Some or all of the information on this page may be supplied by a third-party and not controlled by the DianaMossop.com website or authors and is therefore is not the responsibility of the DianaMossop.com website or its authors.

Testimonials

Hi Diana I would like to give a testimonial about my grandson for your web site I seem to be unable to upload recommendations myself. 'My six year old grandson is growing up in a world where the use of synthetic oestrog…

I have suffered with considerable pains with my gall bladder for a period of approximately thirty years. A friend recommended you to me and, despite some misgivings, I made an appointment. You found that I had an allergy and …