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"A really good practitioner never stops learning and is never qualified as there is always something more to learn."

Diana Mossop

Vitamin C

Introduction to Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that has a number of biological functions.

Sources of Vitamin C

Broccoli, red peppers, currants, Brussels sprouts, parsley, potatoes, citrus fuit, and strawberries are good sources of vitamin C.

Known Side Effect of Using Vitamin C

Some people develop diarrhea after as little as a few grams of vitamin C per day, while others are not bothered by ten times this amount. Strong scientific evidence to define and defend an upper tolerable limit for vitamin C is not available. A review of the available research concluded that high intakes (2–4 grams per day) are well-tolerated by healthy people. However, intake of large amounts of vitamin C can deplete the body of copper an essential nutrient. People should be sure to maintain adequate copper intake at higher intakes of vitamin C. Copper is found in many multivitamin-mineral supplements. Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron and should be avoided by people with iron overload diseases (e.g., hemochromatosis, hemosiderosis). Vitamin C helps recycle the antioxidant, vitamin E. It is widely (and mistakenly) believed that mothers who consume large amounts of vitamin C during pregnancy are at risk of giving birth to an infant with a higher-than-normal requirement for the vitamin. The concern is that the infant could suffer “rebound scurvy,” a vitamin C deficiency caused by not having this increased need met. Even some medical textbooks have subscribed to this theory. In fact, however, the concept of “rebound scurvy” in infants is supported by extremely weak evidence. Since the publication in 1965 of the report upon which this mistaken notion is based, millions of women have consumed high amounts of vitamin C during pregnancy and not a single new case of rebound scurvy has been reported. A preliminary study found that people who took 500 mg per day of vitamin C supplements for one year had a greater increase in wall thickness of the carotid arteries (vessels in the neck that supply blood to the brain) than those who did not take vitamin C. Thickness of carotid artery walls is an indicator of progression of atherosclerosis. Currently, no evidence supports a cause-and-effect relationship for the outcome reported in this study. The vast preponderance of research suggests either a protective or therapeutic effect of vitamin C for heart disease, or no effect at all. People with the following conditions should consult their doctor before supplementing with vitamin C: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, iron overload (hemosiderosis or hemochromatosis), history of kidney stones, or kidney failure. It has been suggested that people who form calcium oxalate kidney stones should avoid vitamin C supplements, because vitamin C can be converted into oxalate and increase urinary oxalate. Initially, these concerns were questioned because of potential errors in the laboratory measurement of oxalate. However, using newer methodology that rules out this problem, recent evidence shows that as little as 1 gram of vitamin C per day can increase the urinary oxalate levels in some people, even those without a history of kidney stones. In one case, 8 grams per day of vitamin C led to dramatic increases in urinary oxalate excretion and kidney stone crystal formation causing bloody urine. People with a history of kidney stones should consult a doctor before taking large amounts (1 gram or more per day) of supplemental vitamin C. Despite possible therapeutic effects of vitamin C in people with diabetes at lower intakes, one case of increased blood sugar levels was reported after taking 4.5 grams per day. Certain medicines may interact with vitamin C. Refer to drug interactions for a list of those medicines.

The Institute of Phytobiophysics offers comprehensive formal Post graduate training to Practitioners of all medical modalities and was accredited by the Guild of Professional Practitioners in 1997.