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"Live Blood Analysis conclusively demonstrates immediate physiological responses to vibrational medicine."

Anthony Mossop

Magnesium

Introduction to Magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral to the human body. It is needed for bone, protein, and fatty acid formation, making new cells, activating B vitamins, relaxing muscles, clotting blood, and forming adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy the body runs on). The secretion and action of insulin also require magnesium.

Sources of Magnesium

Nuts and grains are good sources of magnesium. Beans, dark green vegetables, fish, and meat also contain significant amounts.

Known Side Effect of Using Magnesium

Comments in this section are limited to effects from taking oral magnesium. Side effects from intravenous use of magnesium are not discussed. Taking too much magnesium often leads to diarrhea. For some people this can happen with amounts as low as 350–500 mg per day. More serious problems can develop with excessive magnesium intake from magnesium-containing laxatives. However, the amounts of magnesium found in nutritional supplements are unlikely to cause such problems. People with kidney disease should not take magnesium supplements without consulting a doctor. Vitamin B6 increases the amount of magnesium that can enter cells. As a result, these two nutrients are often taken together. Magnesium may compete for absorption with other minerals, particularly calcium. Taking a multimineral supplement avoids this potential problem. Certain medicines may interact with magnesium. Refer to drug interactions for a list of those medicines.

The Institute of Phytobiophysics was established in 1990 and was affiliated to the Open International University of Complementary medicine in 1992.