DNNMasters SEO URL Provider is running in evaluation mode. Please purchase license on www.dnnmasters.com

 

"Live Blood Analysis conclusively demonstrates immediate physiological responses to vibrational medicine."

Anthony Mossop

Cetyl Myristoleate

Introduction to Cetyl Myristoleate

Cetyl myristoleate (CMO) is the common name for cis-9-cetyl myristoleate. CMO was discovered in 1972 by Harry W. Diehl, Ph.D., a researcher at the National Institutes of Health. At the time, Dr. Diehl was responsible for testing anti-inflammatory drugs on lab animals. In order for him to test the drugs, he first had to artificially induce arthritis in the animals by injecting a heat-killed bacterium called Freund’s adjuvant. Dr. Diehl discovered that Swiss albino mice did not get arthritis after injection of Freund’s adjuvant. Eventually, he was able to determine that cetyl myristoleate was the factor present naturally in mice that was responsible for this protection. When CMO was injected into various strains of rats, it offered the same protection against arthritis.

Sources of Cetyl Myristoleate

Cetyl myristoleate is found in certain animals, including cows, whales, beavers, and mice. As a nutritional supplement it is found in a highly purified, refined form in capsules and tablets. CMO is also available in creams and lotions for topical application.

Known Side Effect of Using Cetyl Myristoleate

No side effects or drug interactions have been reported. At the time of writing, there were no well-known drug interactions with cetyl myristoleate.

The Institute of Phytobiophysics offers comprehensive formal Post graduate training to Practitioners of all medical modalities and was accredited by the Guild of Professional Practitioners in 1997.