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"A really good practitioner never stops learning and is never qualified as there is always something more to learn."

Diana Mossop

Amino Acids Overview

Introduction to Amino Acids Overview

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Twenty amino acids are needed to build the various proteins used in the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues. Eleven of these amino acids can be made by the body itself, while the other nine (called essential amino acids) must come from the diet. The essential amino acids are isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. Another amino acid, histidine, is considered semi-essential because the body does not always require dietary sources of it. The nonessential amino acids are arginine, alanine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, proline, serine, and tyrosine. Other amino acids, such as carnitine, are used by the body in ways other than protein-building and are often used therapeutically.

Sources of Amino Acids Overview

Foods of animal origin, such as meat and poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products, are the richest dietary sources of the essential amino acids. Plant sources of protein are often deficient in one or more essential amino acids. However, these deficiencies can be overcome by consuming a wide variety of plant foods. For example, grains are low in lysine, whereas beans provide an excess of lysine. It was previously believed that, in order for vegetarians to obtain adequate amounts of protein, all of the essential amino acids had to be “balanced” at each meal. For example, a grain and a bean had to be consumed at the same meal. However, more recent research has indicated that, while consuming a proper mix of amino acids is important, it is not necessary to consume them all at the same meal.

Known Side Effect of Using Amino Acids Overview

Most diets provide more protein than the body needs, causing excess nitrogen to be excreted as urea in urine. The excess nitrogen has been linked in some studies with reduced kidney function in old age. Most, but not all studies have found that when people have impaired kidney function, restricting dietary intake of protein slows the rate of decline of kidney function. Excessive protein intake also can increase excretion of calcium, and some evidence has linked high-protein diets with osteoporosis, particularly regarding animal protein. On the other hand, some protein is needed for bone formation. A double-blind study showed that elderly people whose diets provided slightly less than the recommended amount of protein suffered less bone loss if they consumed an additional 20 grams of protein per day. A doctor can help people assess their protein intake. For the drug interactions safety check, refer to the individual amino acids.

Supportive Formulas

Many years have been spent creating the Phytobiophysics formulas that are made from carefully researched combinations of essences from many flowers and plants. We believe that essences enable the body to heal by dealing with the underlying causal emotional trauma so encouraging the body’s own healing process.


Super Fit 1


Flower Formula 2